SARDINIA
1.800 Km of enchanting coastline, unforgettable and unique sandy beaches, white quartz pebbles beaches, awesome small islands and archipelagos
24,090 km2 (9,300 sq mi) Sardinia surface
1,651,793 inhabitants
• population density of 68,57/km2, slightly more than a third of the national average
3 international airports
5 commercial ports
1 transshipment port with post panama cranes
65 well equipped marinas, some of them able to host all year mega yachts
12 golf courses
1 UNESCO World Heritage Site
4 villages on the “Italy’s most beautiful villages” list
3 National parks
10 Regional parks
60 wildlife reserves
1 Geomineral Park, preserved by UNESCO
13 blue flags
2 opera houses, Cagliari and Sassari
22 museums

FIAIPSardegna

Sardinia a Mediterranean dream

There are many excellent reasons for living or holidaying in Sardinia just in the heart of the Mediterranean sea, an ancient and inspiring region that has maintained a “unique” atmosphere built on tradition and respect for the past, an Island with the ability to surprise and charm.
Sardinia is hugged by a blue sea and sandy beaches that stretch into the distance, dotted with a hundred towns and villages, and enriched by a hundred landscapes and dishes.

Sardinia is 1800 kilometres of coast enclosing a rugged, mountainous interior.
The landscape is unspoilt and extraordinarily beautiful, and symbolised by the delicate scented peony, the deep turquoise sea, the forests of oak and ilex, the majestic pink flamingo. Thanks to the island’s central position in the Mediterranean, a house in Sardinia has always been a desirable thing. The Romans built their villas in Sardinia, the Pisans and Aragonese their churches.

This is an island distinguished by a strong local culture, whose uniqueness is expressed in an exceptional legacy of archaeology, museums, environment and folklore. The richness of popular traditions is evident in the village fairs, but also in the renowned arts and crafts. Sardinia is home to the oldest people in the world.
The Island is one of only five “Blue Zones” in the world identified as having residents who often reach age 90 or older, called Centenarians. The other four are Okinawa (Japan), Nicoya (Costa Rica), Icaria (Greece) and the Seventh-day Adventist community in Loma Linda, Calif.